"We are not makers of history. We are made by history." - Martin Luther King, Jr.

5A photo taken of John F. Kennedy’s limo after his assassination.

A photo taken of John F. Kennedy’s limo after his assassination.

45amourbertie:

(via Trudeau slides down a banister)
95smithsonian:

Helen Keller’s Watch, Late 1800s
This week’s Smithsonian Snapshot marks the June 27, 1880, birthday of Helen Keller, a prominent 20th-century advocate for women’s suffrage and workers’ rights.
As a child, Keller contracted an illness that left her deaf and blind. After years of frustrated isolation, she was introduced to Anne Sullivan, who taught Keller to communicate by spelling words into her hand. She eventually learned to read, write and speak, and graduated from Radcliffe College in 1904 as the first person who was deaf and blind to earn a Bachelor of Arts degree.
In 1892, Keller met John Hitz, superintendent of the Volta Bureau at Alexander Graham Bell’s institution for the deaf. Hitz presented this Swiss-made “touch watch” to Keller as a gift. It is specially designed with pins around the case edge to mark the hours.
Keller’s inspiring story made her an international celebrity, and she became a prominent spokesperson for disability rights, an important cause that she symbolizes to this day. The Smithsonian collected this watch in 1975.
To learn more about historic timepieces from the collection, visit the National Museum of American History’s “On Time” online exhibition website. To learn more about women’s suffrage, visit the museum’s “Treasures of American History” website.
This item is one of 137 million artifacts, works of art and specimens in the Smithsonian’s collection. It is not currently on display. For more information about this watch, visit the National Museum of American History website.
More from the Smithsonian Snapshot series

smithsonian:

Helen Keller’s Watch, Late 1800s

This week’s Smithsonian Snapshot marks the June 27, 1880, birthday of Helen Keller, a prominent 20th-century advocate for women’s suffrage and workers’ rights.

As a child, Keller contracted an illness that left her deaf and blind. After years of frustrated isolation, she was introduced to Anne Sullivan, who taught Keller to communicate by spelling words into her hand. She eventually learned to read, write and speak, and graduated from Radcliffe College in 1904 as the first person who was deaf and blind to earn a Bachelor of Arts degree.

In 1892, Keller met John Hitz, superintendent of the Volta Bureau at Alexander Graham Bell’s institution for the deaf. Hitz presented this Swiss-made “touch watch” to Keller as a gift. It is specially designed with pins around the case edge to mark the hours.

Keller’s inspiring story made her an international celebrity, and she became a prominent spokesperson for disability rights, an important cause that she symbolizes to this day. The Smithsonian collected this watch in 1975.

To learn more about historic timepieces from the collection, visit the National Museum of American History’s “On Time” online exhibition website. To learn more about women’s suffrage, visit the museum’s “Treasures of American History” website.

This item is one of 137 million artifacts, works of art and specimens in the Smithsonian’s collection. It is not currently on display. For more information about this watch, visit the National Museum of American History website.

More from the Smithsonian Snapshot series

87annielaurie:

Quentin Roosevelt, Theodore Roosevelt’s son.

annielaurie:

Quentin Roosevelt, Theodore Roosevelt’s son.

442collective-history:

Polish children imprisoned in Auschwitz look out from behind the barbed wire fence. (July 1944)
Photograph from the Main Commission for the Investigation of Nazi War Crimes, courtesy of USHMM Photo Archives.

collective-history:

Polish children imprisoned in Auschwitz look out from behind the barbed wire fence. (July 1944)

Photograph from the Main Commission for the Investigation of Nazi War Crimes, courtesy of USHMM Photo Archives.

(via collectivehistory-deactivated20)

123jaymug:

The World’s First Car Ad from 1898.

jaymug:

The World’s First Car Ad from 1898.

307womenatwar:

A WAAF tractor driver with a train of full bomb trolleys, RAF Mildenhall 1942

womenatwar:

A WAAF tractor driver with a train of full bomb trolleys, RAF Mildenhall 1942

71fuckyeahstrangeleaders:

5meodalt:

Mussolini: Moral of the story, don’t be a dictator. 

The desecrated remains of Benito Mussolini and his mistress Clara Petacci. After execution by firing squad, the bodies of the two above as well as other Fascist supporters were loaded into a moving van to Milan, where they were summarily spat upon, kicked, shot at, and eventually suspended upside down from meat hooks from the roof of a gas station in the Piazza Loreto.

fuckyeahstrangeleaders:

5meodalt:

Mussolini: Moral of the story, don’t be a dictator. 

The desecrated remains of Benito Mussolini and his mistress Clara Petacci. After execution by firing squad, the bodies of the two above as well as other Fascist supporters were loaded into a moving van to Milan, where they were summarily spat upon, kicked, shot at, and eventually suspended upside down from meat hooks from the roof of a gas station in the Piazza Loreto.

(via madhistory)

4Rt. Hon. Sir Wilfrid Laurier, (Prime Minister of Canada) b. Nov. 20, 1841 - d. Feb. 17, 1919.
Rt. Hon. Sir Wilfrid Laurier, (Prime Minister of Canada) b. Nov. 20, 1841 - d. Feb. 17, 1919.

(via anationinthemaking)

9fuckyeahwwiipropaganda:


United: The United Nations Fight for Freedom, Leslie Darrell Ragan, 1943

source

fuckyeahwwiipropaganda:

United: The United Nations Fight for Freedom, Leslie Darrell Ragan, 1943

source